Tradition

Tradition bedeutet für uns,
das Weitergeben von Wissen, Werten, Erfahrungen, Leidenschaftund Geschicklichkeit.

Then as now

My grandfather commissioned an expert report to prove to what extent a plastic comb can become statically charged and how a wooden comb compares. It was found that there is no electrostatic charge when using wooden combs, whereas with plastic combs up to 60,000 V/m were measured on the comb and up to several 100,000 V/m on the combed hair.

Even in 1985, it had already been scientifically proven that these electrostatic charges do not have a positive effect on the organism.

Martin Christian Groetsch - der erste Holzkamm
Grotsch Gutachten - Elektrostatischeladung

Excerpt from the expert opinion of Prof. Dr. Anton Schneider dated 25.11.1985

“Electrical disturbances from outside have a stressful effect on the organism. It is a fact that there are more and more electro-sensitive or electro-allergic people.”

My grandfather describes in his brochure from the 80s a “new comb feeling” that is shared by every new customer today.

Here is an excerpt from the text of his brochure:

Martin Christian Groetsch: “However, the professional also demands of a good comb that it is suitable for intensive massage of the scalp, although I know from experience that this extremely beneficial function has become almost completely unknown to an alarming extent. Many of my clients have enthusiastically expressed in unsolicited verdicts a “new combing sensation”, an “experience” and generally of a previously unknown feeling of well-being and I will try to explain this in itself quite natural process.

A scalp massage is all the more pleasant the harder the comb teeth are, or the better the tips of the teeth are polished. Especially injected plastic combs have sharp tooth tips and force the user – quite unconsciously – to style with combs lying flat to avoid the painful scratching. So it’s that simple to be able to make so many friends with just a comb.”

And it was precisely this passion that spilled over from my grandfather, to my father and to me.

Combing is good for you and healthy.

Foundation 1848

A. Carl Groetsch founded the company in Burgthann in 1848 and started comb production from a wide variety of natural materials.

The first comb cutting machines came to Burgthann from England and were driven there by water power via belts.

Early 20th century

A grandson of A. Carl Groetsch took most of the machines to Rollhofen at the beginning of the 20th century and continued to produce many combs there.

The grandson was my grandfather – Martin Christian Groetsch – Germany’s last master comb maker.

Besides the natural materials like horn, tortoise shell, ivory and wood, there were also new materials like bakelite, hard rubber and various plastics.

Bakelite and hard rubber did not catch on. Plastic was the new material and so plastic injection machines were bought and the comb cutting machines were brought into the basement.

I still remember the stories of my grandparents well.
There was a shortage of combs after World War II, my grandfather was a prisoner of war and it was my grandmother who crushed toothbrush cups to make plastic combs again.

My father remembers how his siblings and he cleaned cosmetic bottles in the river adjacent to the house so that they could be crushed and then combs were made from them.

Meisterbrief Groetsch
Meisterbrief

Mid 20th century

Products made of plastic prevailed and so my grandfather did not train any of his sons to become comb makers. All the sons became toolmakers and made the tool moulds with which they produced plastic combs.

Hydropower at every location

It is interesting that the parent company in Burgthann is located directly on the Schwarzach and that the river drove a hydroelectric power plant then as it does today.

My grandfather was so convinced of the advantages that he bought a property in Rollhofen that was located directly on a stream and drove a turbine to generate electricity.

In the 70s he moved to Enzendorf. A plot of land right next to the turbine with its own hydroelectric power plant.

End of the 60s - beginning of the 70s

From plastic comb to wooden comb

There must have been hundreds of thousands of plastic combs that my grandfather produced every year. At that time, there was no way to recycle the plastic waste.
This annoyed my grandfather a lot, because he realised early on that plastic is not the friendliest material for nature and the environment.

Then the hair became statically charged when combed, which could be very unpleasant.

And there was also the burr (thin excess of plastic – tooth up and down),
which was uncomfortable on the scalp and damaging to the hair.

All this made my grandfather look into other materials.

Oldest Groetsch wooden comb

The oldest wooden combs I have found are from 1973.
I was just one year old then.

My grandfather remembered what he had learned from his father and grandfather and brought out the comb-cutting machines from the cellar and combined the knowledge of the ancestors with the current state of the art.

The first wooden combs were made of local woods. This did not lead to enthusiastic customers. Then my grandfather expanded the selection of woods and used exotic woods such as ebony, rosewood, amaranth, sandalwood or rosewood and bang, the demand was soon greater than he alone could produce.

Die ersten Groetsch Holzkämme

80s

With the organic wave in the 80s came the change from exotic woods back to indigenous woods.

90s

In 1991, my father, Martin Groetsch, took over his father’s business as a master toolmaker.

I can still remember that no matter where we lived, there was a comb cutting machine in the garage on which my father made combs from wood and horn.

My father optimised manufacturing processes incorporating the old machines, as they are the heart of resource-saving handling of natural materials and sustainability.

The company grew steadily and healthily.

Close cooperation with natural hairdressers resulted in hair cutting combs and a customer gave the impulse for our product: Spaghetti Lifter / Salad Servers

Early 20th century

A grandson of A. Carl Groetsch took most of the machines to Rollhofen at the beginning of the 20th century and continued to produce many combs there.

The grandson was my grandfather – Martin Christian Groetsch – Germany’s last master comb maker.

Besides the natural materials like horn, tortoise shell, ivory and wood, there were also new materials like bakelite, hard rubber and various plastics.

Bakelite and hard rubber did not catch on. Plastic was the new material and so plastic injection machines were bought and the comb cutting machines were brought into the basement.

I still remember the stories of my grandparents well.
There was a shortage of combs after World War II, my grandfather was a prisoner of war and it was my grandmother who crushed toothbrush cups to make plastic combs again.

My father remembers how his siblings and he cleaned cosmetic bottles in the river adjacent to the house so that they could be crushed and then combs were made from them.

Meisterbrief Groetsch
Meisterbrief

End of the 60s - beginning of the 70s

From plastic comb to wooden comb

There must have been hundreds of thousands of plastic combs that my grandfather produced every year. At that time, there was no way to recycle the plastic waste.
This annoyed my grandfather a lot, because he realised early on that plastic is not the friendliest material for nature and the environment.

Then the hair became statically charged when combed, which could be very unpleasant.

And there was also the burr (thin excess of plastic – tooth up and down),
which was uncomfortable on the scalp and damaging to the hair.

All this made my grandfather look into other materials.

Oldest Groetsch wooden comb

The oldest wooden combs I have found are from 1973.
I was just one year old then.

My grandfather remembered what he had learned from his father and grandfather and brought out the comb-cutting machines from the cellar and combined the knowledge of the ancestors with the current state of the art.

The first wooden combs were made of local woods. This did not lead to enthusiastic customers. Then my grandfather expanded the selection of woods and used exotic woods such as ebony, rosewood, amaranth, sandalwood or rosewood and bang, the demand was soon greater than he alone could produce.

Die ersten Groetsch Holzkämme

Foundation 1848

A. Carl Groetsch founded the company in Burgthann in 1848 and started comb production from a wide variety of natural materials.

The first comb cutting machines came to Burgthann from England and were driven there by water power via belts.

Mid 20th century

Products made of plastic prevailed and so my grandfather did not train any of his sons to become comb makers. All the sons became toolmakers and made the tool moulds with which they produced plastic combs.

Hydropower at every location

It is interesting that the parent company in Burgthann is located directly on the Schwarzach and that the river drove a hydroelectric power plant then as it does today.

My grandfather was so convinced of the advantages that he bought a property in Rollhofen that was located directly on a stream and drove a turbine to generate electricity.

In the 70s he moved to Enzendorf. A plot of land right next to the turbine with its own hydroelectric power plant.

80s

With the organic wave in the 80s came the change from exotic woods back to indigenous woods.

90s

In 1991, my father, Martin Groetsch, took over his father’s business as a master toolmaker.

I can still remember that no matter where we lived, there was a comb cutting machine in the garage on which my father made combs from wood and horn.

My father optimised manufacturing processes incorporating the old machines, as they are the heart of resource-saving handling of natural materials and sustainability.

The company grew steadily and healthily.

Close cooperation with natural hairdressers resulted in hair cutting combs and a customer gave the impulse for our product: Spaghetti Lifter / Salad Servers

2020

Melanie Groetsch - Holzkamm Herstellung - 2

Today I, Melanie Groetsch, have been running the business for 15 years with my family and team, in the 5th generation.

The following points are important to me:

  • Quality of the products
  • My passion to be connected with nature and to produce combs from it that bring a smile to your face.
  • Living sustainability
  • At least CO2 neutral production
  • Genuine handicraft
  • Respect for the resources wood and horn
  • Durability of the products
  • Sustainable natural hair care